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Linda Straub Jones

Director Market Planning - Compliance
LexisNexis Risk Solutions

Linda Straub Jones is a Director of Market Planning for Compliance at LexisNexis Risk Solutions. Her specialties include Bankrutpcy and Deceased data. In her role as Director of Market Planninig, she reviews industry rules, regulations, laws and compliance matters, and determines solutions that LexisNexis may provide to assist customers.

Recent Posts


Three Ways Data Offers Businesses the Ultimate Insurance Policy

We’ve all heard of car insurance, home insurance, renter’s insurance, health and dental insurance, business insurance, malpractice insurance and yes, even pet insurance!  But how about data insurance? Our customers have stated that 15-20 percent of a collection agency’s bottom-line goes toward the cost of compliance.  Here’s something new to think about: If you currently […]


Deceased Account Collections Requires A Specialized and Compliance-Based Approach

Having a plan in place for how your company will manage collections of deceased account holders will go a long way toward making sure this delicate situation is handled with extra care. It is important to note that the baby boomer generation is far more credit savvy, and will expect there to be a disciplined process around this inevitable event. Additionally, it is essential that your plan is well thought out, and in compliance with regulations.

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Are You Properly Reporting Bankruptcies to Credit Bureaus?

In May of this year, several of the larger banks were in the news for not correctly reporting debts on credit bureaus that were discharged in bankruptcy. Pursuant to lawsuits, which were filed in White Plains, New York Bankruptcy Court, and investigations by the US Trustee’s Office, the banks were not correctly updating trade-line accounts on consumer’s credit bureaus with information that the debt was discharged in bankruptcy.


The Changing Face of the Collection Industry in Light of New Regulations

We’ve all seen the headlines lately with the statistics of lawsuits rising against collection agencies, of penalties handed down by the CFPB and the courts, of settlements against collection agencies and even speculation that the business of debt collection is going the way of the dinosaur. But is the business of collections really going away, or is it just going through another change?