Mike Ginsberg: Remembering an ARM Industry Stalwart

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Mike Ginsberg

Mike Ginsberg

Pat Carroll, a well-known and well respected collection industry veteran passed away unexpectedly on March 2. The outpouring of emotional, heart-felt condolences since his passing has been overwhelming and for good reason.

Pat lived his professional life the right way.  He worked hard, gained an incredible amount of skill and rose up in the ranks from the bottom rung to the very peak.  However, he was always available, attended trade show where he worked the exhibit halls effortlessly because everyone knew him and wanted to speak to him.

When you look up tenure in the dictionary, Pat’s smiling face should be there. He was with Payco, later OSI, forever before moving on to Nationwide Credit where he ended his career. I assure you that he was offered opportunities to move on but he chose to stay.  Many others would have chased new ventures but not Pat.  He was loyal and committed, attributes that have become scarcer in the workplace over the decades.

Pat Carroll

Pat Carroll

On a personal note, Pat was always there for me. He returned every one of my calls quickly. He always had time for a cup of coffee at conferences. For nearly 25 years, Pat provided me with his perspective on collections which was exceptional. I learned a lot about the industry from Pat but, even more important, I was able to spend time with a true professional and a gentleman. Pat’s family is planning a memorial service on March 30th.

Rest in peace, my friend.

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Posted in ARM in Focus, Debt Buying, Debt Collection, Opinion .

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  • avatar John McNamara says:

    I am glad you got the word out, Mike. Thanks.

  • avatar Tim Bauer says:

    Pat Carroll was a true Gentleman. He always said positive things about you and your company when you ran into him at a conference and he or you were talking to a client. He did it the right way. He had substance. When I work with young sales people in the industry I often used Pat as an example. I tell people: “Be like Pat. Bring something to the table beyond a credit card for buying drinks and entertaining”. Know your business. Know your operations. Pat surely did.

  • avatar Robert Russo says:

    I have known Pat Carroll since my days with PAYCO American in the early 1990’s.

    Back then, I would routinely stop him in the halls to ask him questions about the industry and after he finished responding, I would often look at him and say
    “I want to be like you when I grow up”… He would laugh as Pat did and quickly say “be kind – be courteous and ask em for the money”…

    One of industry’s good guys..

  • avatar Charles Leahy says:

    Mike,

    Thanks for the kind (and accurate) article on Pat. As my boss and colleague for many years (at Payco and NCI), I saw (daily) his tenacity in pursuing goals, his expert social skills (no one worked a room better!) and his long knowledge of the industry. I’ll miss those phone calls and those dinners. RIP. Charles Leahy Solutions.

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