Free registration is required to access these resources. Login or Register.

Premium compliance products are also available in the insideARM Store

AGAIN with this “debtor’s prison” business.

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan (no relation to the radiant Amy Madigan, whom I’ve loved in everything from that one episode of “Hart to Hart” called “Slow Boat to Murder” to her chilling turn as the sister of Brother Justin in HBO’s “Carnivàle” and as long as we keep it a secret from my boss, Stephanie, you guys can totally email me to talk ALL ABOUT “Carnivàle” and I will DROP EVERYTHING) spent yesterday congratulating herself and other lawmakers for Keeping America Debtors’ Prison Free!

Except:

Fixing the Issue of “Debtors’ Prisons”

ACA Reiterates: Debtors’ Prisons Don’t Exist, Nor Are They Returning

Debtors Prisons Don’t Exist, Nor Are They Returning

Madigan is conflating two separate issues: “Long ago, our society recognized that it was immoral to send a poor person to debtor’s prison,” she said in a statement. And she’s right: we don’t send people to debtors’ prisons these days. (Though, if you’ll let me put on these spats, monocle, and top hat: debtors’ prisons were a hell of a lot better than England’s Victorian-era workhouses. Poor people would literally rather have died in the streets than be sent to a workhouse.)

So, what is happening? Contempt of court. People are serving jail time for not appearing for their court dates. And that’s an entirely separate issue.

So. Again. And someone PLEASE say this slowly to Lisa Madigan (she’s not taking my calls currently):

Debtors’. Prisons. Do. Not. Exist. And since they don’t exist: You. Can’t. Put. An. End. To. Them.

But really, the best way to illustrate this issue is by turning to the Book of Mean Girls:

 


Related Products

Telephone Communication Compliance: The CFPB's Consent Orders Thumbnail

Telephone Communication Compliance: The CFPB's Consent Orders

Our Telephone Communication Compliance: The CFPB’s Consent Orders guide is designed to help debt collectors comply with consent orders that hint at telephone communication violations. The report includes easy-to-understand explanations of each consent order and a comprehensive chart of all relevant consent orders, keeping the information you need right at your fingertips! This paper has been excerpted from insideARM's larger "The CFPB's Consent Orders Regulating the ARM Industry" report, available for sale now.

Staying Compliant – and Out of Court – with the TCPA Thumbnail

Staying Compliant – and Out of Court – with the TCPA

This reference guide distills the information presented in our webinar. It comes complete with a link to the full recording of the webinar – great for use for all-staff trainings and quarterly in-services -- as well as the slide deck and full transcript of the webinar. This guide doesn’t just walk through what agencies should and should not be doing, going forward -- it contains the full Q&A from the webinar, too. (This product is approved for DBA International Certification Credit.)

The CFPB's Consent Orders Regulating the ARM Industry Thumbnail

The CFPB's Consent Orders Regulating the ARM Industry

Our guide on The CFPB’s Consent Orders Regulating the ARM Industry is the first report of its kind designed to help debt collectors comply with consent orders. The report includes easy-to-understand explanations of each consent order and a comprehensive chart of all relevant consent orders, keeping the information you need right at your fingertips! This report will be updated quarterly.

UPDATED! CFPB’s Advice to the Consumer (through March 2016) Thumbnail

UPDATED! CFPB’s Advice to the Consumer (through March 2016)

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau hosts more than 80 of the most common consumer questions about debt collection on its Ask CFPB website. And since the Bureau was created for the sole purpose of representing and protecting consumers, debt collectors need to know how the CFPB communicates with them. That’s why insideARM compiled the answers to all 88 questions in one user-friendly report. Using the CFPB’s guidance as a model for your own compliance priorities, policies and procedures means your company will be able to keep up with the Bureau before it feels the need to examine your agency. ALL ANSWERS UPDATED THROUGH MARCH 2016.

Advertisement