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Credit Grantors

A credit grantor is any individual or business that extends credit to customers. The credit can be for other businesses or consumers and can come in many forms, such as closed-end loans (like auto loans, mortgages, and student loans), revolving loans (like credit cards or certain home equity loans), or a hybrid of the two. Some credit is backed by property or assets.

In the U.S., the primary credit grantors are large commercial banks and credit unions. But credit is also extended by small businesses, governments, and other organizations.

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Kaulkin Ginsberg Gears up for Spring 2015 Research Fellows Program

Kaulkin Ginsberg, the leading consultancy and M&A advisory firm focused on the accounts receivable management (ARM) industry, begins the fourth semester of its Research Fellows Program in conjunction with the University of Maryland, College Park’s Department of Economics undergraduate studies program on Monday, Feb. 16. Fellows will focus their research on emerging market segments and consumer credit opportunities.

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CFPB Hits Wells Fargo and JPMorgan Chase for Mortgage Title Kickbacks

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and the Maryland Attorney General announced Thursday that they have taken action against Wells Fargo and JPMorgan Chase for an illegal marketing-services-kickback scheme they participated in with Genuine Title, a now-defunct title company. The Bureau and Maryland also took action against former Wells Fargo employee Todd Cohen and his […]

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Banking Association Urges Further Scrutiny of CFPB’s Complaints Database by Federal Inspectors

The American Bankers Association this week sent a letter to the Federal Reserve’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) offering support for two ongoing audits of the CFPB’s complaints database and urging the OIG to expand the scope of the audits to address, among other things, the CFPB’s proposed plan to publish consumer narratives alongside complaints.

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Online Lenders to Pay $21 Million to Settle FTC’s Largest Payday Lending Case

Two payday lending companies have settled Federal Trade Commission charges that they violated the law by charging consumers undisclosed and inflated fees. Under the proposed settlement, AMG Services, Inc. and MNE Services, Inc. will pay $21 million – the largest FTC recovery in a payday lending case – and will waive another $285 million in charges that were assessed but not collected.