Charge-off Feed Link

Charge-off

A charge-off (or chargeoff, charge off) is the declaration by a creditor that a debt, typically a credit card account, is unlikely to be collected. This occurs when a consumer becomes severely delinquent on a debt. Traditionally, creditors will charge off an account when it has been delinquent for 180 days.

After an account is charged off, a creditor may still pursue payment by outsourcing it to a third party debt collection agency, selling the debt to a debt purchaser, or forwarding the account to an attorney to consider legal action. If the activity results in a recovered amount, it is added back to the creditor’s books. As such, most credit grantors report a “net charge-off” figure, which factors in recoveries after charge off.

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Credit Card Markets Rebound as U.S. Economy Improves

The U.S. credit card market bounced back in the second quarter as the economy improved, according to the American Bankers Association’s December 2014 Credit Card Market Monitor report. The number of new accounts increased and monthly purchase volumes picked up, while the distribution of accounts resumed its shift away from “revolvers” who carry balances month-to-month.

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New York Adopts New Statewide Regulations on Debt Collection

New York State’s Department of Financial Services Wednesday announced the formal adoption of new debt collection regulations that place new specific disclosure and written communication requirements on third party debt collectors and debt buyers. In addition to new requirements, the rules also create a structure for the use of email in debt collection efforts.