Credit Card Receivables Feed Link

Credit Card Receivables

A credit card receivable is money owed to a bank or issuer on the outstanding balance in a credit card account. Because the borrower is contractually obligated to pay the balance, the creditor expects this amount to be repaid. If a borrower does not repay the balance, it is often charged off as a loss. Since credit card usage is so widespread, and account balances can soar quite high, credit card receivables form the backbone of many financial services functions, such as asset-backed securities, debt collection, and debt buying.

For more information on credit cards and the role they play in the ARM industry, please see our special content section, The Credit Card Issue.

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CFPB Seeks Input on Credit Card Market, Including Collection and Debt Sales Practices

The CFPB announced Tuesday it is seeking public comment on how the credit card market is functioning and the impact of the Bureau’s credit card protections on consumers and issuers. This inquiry will focus on issues including credit card terms, the use of consumer disclosures, credit card debt collection practices, and rewards programs.

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CFPB Takes Action to Shut Down Sham Credit Card

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Tuesday asked a federal district court to enter a consent order that would permanently ban a Texas-based company, Union Workers Credit Services, from offering any consumer credit products or services after it duped thousands of consumers into signing up for a sham credit card. The order would also require the company to pay a penalty of $70,000.

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Credit Card Markets Rebound as U.S. Economy Improves

The U.S. credit card market bounced back in the second quarter as the economy improved, according to the American Bankers Association’s December 2014 Credit Card Market Monitor report. The number of new accounts increased and monthly purchase volumes picked up, while the distribution of accounts resumed its shift away from “revolvers” who carry balances month-to-month.