Collection Laws and Regulations Feed Link

Collection Laws and Regulations

Debt collectors are regulated by the FTC on the federal level. At the state level, attorneys general are typically responsible for enforcing state and federal laws. A few local governments also separately regulate debt collectors.

The laws that govern the ARM industry are civil, meaning that liability is almost always monetary. So a state’s attorney general will not file criminal charges against a debt collector accused of violating the law, rather, he/she will sue for damages. Collection laws include federal and state statutes that govern the proper operation of companies and personnel that work in the debt collection industry. The most comprehensive collection law is the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). Other federal laws that collectors must follow include the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) and the data security requirements of the Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act (GLBA).

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New Whitepaper Examines Mobile Strategies in a Post-FCC/TCPA World

The whitepaper, developed with DialConnection’s expertise and their incredibly popular webinar, Mobile Strategies in the Ever-Changing Age of Compliance, Presented by DialConnection, looks at four specific best-practice strategies for mobile numbers: Line type identification; time of day for outbound attempts; attempt counters to wireless numbers; and identifying wrong parties.

Outsource In-House Signboards

The 986 Words That Have Guided First Party Outsourcing for 15 Years

For the past 15 years lawyers have artfully drafted agreements that address such things as whether the accounts being worked are “in default” and whether the employees of an agency working the business are “de facto” employees of the creditor. Often the contract would require that those same employees be segregated from the rest of the company and/or working in isolated space. Numerous other provisions in First Party service agreements all have their genesis in deMayo. Times have changed.

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Another Reason For Collectors To Be Cautious When Calling Consumer Cell Phones

Given the data that must be weighed by a creditor or debt collector in determining where a consumer resides – the area code of the number called, the zip code of the residence of record, any statements by the consumer about his or her place of residence – it is certain that the Discover Consent Order will be the start of yet another flood of consumer lawsuits against the collection industry regarding the calling of consumer cell phones.

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Eleventh Circuit’s Mistaken Interpretation Likely to Expose Attorneys to Increased FDCPA Liability

The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals recently handed down a decision that went too far in holding that all litigation related activity is subject to the FDCPA. In pursuing their client’s judgment, an attorney and law firm obtained a garnishment against Nedzad Miljkovic. Miljkovic filed a claim for exemption in response, which the creditor disputed. However, the writ was eventually dissolved on the creditor’s attorney’s motion after Miljkovic provided discovery showing that his wages were exempt from garnishment.