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Collection Law Firms

Debt collection law firms, also known as creditor’s rights law firms, focus on the collection of debt through the court system. While traditional collection agencies are not authorized to file lawsuits against debtors, collection attorneys specialize in taking debt cases to court to try to obtain court-ordered judgments against debtors.

In addition to teams of legal professionals, many collection law firms have extensive collection operations that conduct more traditional debt recovery activity.


Executive Change: CenterPoint Legal Solutions Welcomes Shannon Battani as Director of Legal Network

CenterPoint Legal Solutions announced today that Shannon Battani has joined the company as Director of Legal Network. “We are ecstatic to have the opportunity to work with a proven industry leader of Shannon’s caliber,” said President Aaron Rose.  Mark Hutchins, Senior Vice-President of Operations, added, “Her extensive legal solutions experience within the ARM industry provides […]


Oral Arguments in CFPB v. Hanna Suggest Long Road Ahead

Oral arguments on the Defendant’s Motion to Dismiss the CFPB action against the Georgia law firm Frederick J Hanna & Associates P.C. were held on June 3rd. The stakes are high, not only for the Hanna law firm, but also any law firm that handles a high volume of consumer debt collection matters. The case should be front and center for all law firms practicing in this space.

In Writing

In Writing: What the New West Virigina Updates Mean for Debt Collectors

West Virginia had once been described as one of the most treacherous states within which to conduct debt collection business. Collection agencies were frequently sued by consumers for contact after the consumer alleged to have retained an attorney. Some updates to the West Virginia Consumer Credit Protection Act, however, could offer both clarity and protections for collection agencies.


Supreme Court to Hear Case on Statutory Damages Without Actual Harm; Could Impact FDCPA Cases

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear an important case that will decide whether a plaintiff who cannot show any actual harm from a violation of the FCRA nevertheless has standing to sue for statutory damages in federal court. The consequences of the decision will likely extend significantly beyond FCRA litigation and affect numerous other statutes, including the FDCPA and TCPA .